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Divided U.S. Attention Aids Casino Companies

So far, the United States has had enough on its plate to largely leave the debate over online gambling to the companies and the fringe media. But what will happen if it is ever the case that the U.S. government finally can take the time to turn some serious attention towards online casino gambling? Will the full force of the American polity come down hard on online casinos, those who operate them, and those who play games at them while on U.S. soil? This is difficult to speculate on, simply because there are serious doubts as to whether online casino gambling will ever take a place of priority on the agenda of the U.S. government.

Is this to the advantage of the online casino world, or to its detriment? Well, online casinos have managed to still do brisk business in the United States despite a de facto ban on online gambling, and the U.S. is an open information society and there are few controls on accessing the internet, so the relative U.S. distraction with fighting the War on Terror on its various fronts, the debate over abortion, Supreme Court justices, and the state of American cinema all play to the advantage of online casino companies. Were Washington to effectively take up a solid, lasting, strong position in the debate, it is likely that it would be seen as a national security manner – meaning bad tidings for online casino companies if this is the case.

Gambling online is not just a business for online casinos, but a form of entertainment for U.S. citizens and indeed citizens all around the world of various countries, each having their own opinion about online casino gambling. It is unlikely that the U.S. will actively enforce laws it interprets as applying to online gambling so long as online casinos are not perceived to pose a threat to American’s security.

OCA News Editor

With a background in game development spanning 8 years, Sam Peterson is OCA’s leading authority in the world of online gaming. His focuses include new releases and gaming providers.

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