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Slot Machine Glitch Leads to Federal Hacking Case

Slot Machine Glitch Leads to Federal Hacking Case

A Las Vegas man, John Kane, who won half a million dollars by exploiting a glitch in a video poker machine has had a hacking case built against him by Federal prosecutors.

Slot Machine Glitch Leads to Federal Hacking Case

A man who took advantage of a slot machine glitch has had a hacking case built against him by federal prosecutors

The case has been built upon the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), a 1984 law which many critics say is far too broad.

The Act is designed to punish those who “exceed authorizes access” to computers.”

However, Kane’s lawyer says that he despite exploiting a buy in a machine known as Game King, he didn’t violate the CFAA.

The lawyer, Andrew Leavitt, says that Kane was playing by the rules imposed by the machine, “all these guys did is simply push a sequence of buttons that they were legally entitled to push.”

The bug they exploited was very simple, the machine allowed gamblers to insert more money after a winning spin as long as the “double up” feature was enabled. This would then change the size of their bet and increase the payout proportionally. Using this buy an $800 payout could be turned into an $8,000 payout.

OCA News Editor

Jenny McKinnley is OCA’s financial correspondent. After spending years on the trading floor in both NY and London, she offers insight from the inside out on world financial news and events.

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