Click Now!

Are You Betting Your Welfare Money Away

Would you spend your welfare check on gambling, cigarettes or alcohol? In New York State, it might be illegal if the senate has its way. According to the New York Post, Republican Thomas Libous has introduced a bill that would bar welfare recipients from using their public assistance cash to fund these “bad habits” and vices.

“Public assistance is designed to help needy families provide for their children until they can transition back to the workforce and become self-sufficient,” said state Sen. Thomas Libous (R-Binghamton), the deputy majority leader and bill sponsor.

The bill would also ban spending welfare money on adult entertainment. Violators of the ban would lose their benefits for one month. The second time a “perpetrator” is busted, he or she would lose their welfare checks for three months. Like many other things in the USA, “three strikes and you’re out!” The third time someone is caught “being naughty with welfare”, they would lose their rights to welfare money from the state of New York.

Like many other things in the USA, “three strikes and you’re out!” The third time someone is caught “being naughty with welfare”,

In New York, welfare recipients receive their money via a special debit card issued by the state. As of today, they can spend the money on anything they like – not just food. The current bill would prevent welfare debit cards from being used at liquor stores, sex shops and betting parlors.

The issue came up when 3 New Yorkers called the senator’s office complaining that they had seen people using their welfare debit cards at Walmart and liquor stores to buy alcohol and cigarettes.

9 US states (Arizona, California, Colorado, Indiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Pennsylvania and Washington have already passed similar laws. If you’re living off welfare, you’d better get in those last minute bets on your welfare card!

OCA News Editor

Jenny McKinnley is OCA’s financial correspondent. After spending years on the trading floor in both NY and London, she offers insight from the inside out on world financial news and events.

COMMENTS

comments